The dangers of taking medications when you don’t need them

The dangers of taking medications when you don't need themPill frenzy is spreading more and more with every day, as more and more people decide they need this or that pill for the treatment of the condition they have. In many cases, this kind of self-diagnosis is not likely to lead to anything good, because an average person can rarely make the right decision about the kind of drug and the dose they need to be taking, if that medicine is necessary for their conditions at all. While many patients with quite serious chronic conditions fail to take their meds regularly, others follow the routines religiously. However, that second group may not realize that, say, taking antibiotics when you have cough and sore throat can actually do more harm than good.

Although most of the drugs available in the United States are prescription drugs (i.e. supposed to be available after the individual sees a doctor first), it’s becoming easier to get the treatment necessary by just going online and placing an order. The simplicity of the process and lower prices the customer has to pay compared to visiting a pharmacy that requires a prescription creates an illusion of being able to treat any conditions present. Since the internet offers tons of information on diseases, symptoms and treatment methods, very often you do not need to dig deep – just buy the medicine you want and start the treatment.

Needless to say, this kind of behavior should not be encouraged, because buying drugs online after you consult a doctor and realize you do not have the coverage you need to get prescription drugs. It’s completely different when you choose not to see a doctor and buy the amount of drug required after reading a few articles and going through the symptom check list. Drugs have healing powers, but they can be just as dangerous as any disease if you are taking them incorrectly. The most typical example could be antibiotics, which seem like a panacea to many people with even a few symptoms like sneezing, sore throat and cough. The trick is, taking antibiotics for no reason and without first consulting a doctor to see if that particular kind is going to help for that particular bacteria, can actually make the situation worse by letting the bacteria get accustomed to the drug and avoid being affected by it.

This is just one of the many examples of how thoughtless use of the medicine you can buy without a prescription can affect you more than the disease you are trying to treat is. Drugs can really help take control over your body and make sure those symptoms are history, but only as long as you know the exact dose and why exactly you need to be using this medicine. Unless you have a medical degree, this is not the kind of decision you can make after reading the label or typing your symptoms into an online symptom checker. There is a reason for doctors to require years and years of training, so that taking drugs is a precise carefully controlled process that the patient will be sure to benefit from.

 

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